Tom Smith Treasure Hunt Begins

For 150 years, Christmas crackers have been a traditional part of our Christmas festivities; Tom Smith having created this wonderful addition to our Christmas dinner tables in 1847, acting on the inspirational sound of logs crackling on an open fire. Tom Smith Crackers were granted their first Royal Warrant in 1906, and today the Tom Smith brand, owned by International Greetings, is still privileged to be the official supplier of Christmas crackers to the Royal Household; a position which we hold in very high regard.
Tom Smith Crackers have a historic spirit and a breath of heritage which is well represented in the various designs. Every year we research the current trends and outlets to ensure our crackers are the market leaders demonstrating new, innovative designs and concepts that are created year on year to keep Christmas traditions alive. Although we refresh the content, jokes and activities, we ensure that they remain classic and traditional in look and feel.
Tom Smith were recently contacted by loyal customers, who kindly sent in an original Tom Smith Cracker Box, which they believe dates back to 1850s!
The family who contacted Tom Smith believe that the box was given to their great-grandmother, Constantine Juliet Barry. Constantine was the granddaughter of Sir Charles Barryan English architect best known for his role in the rebuilding of the Palace of Westminster (also known as the Houses of Parliament) in London during the 19th century.
The incredibly rare and traditionally stylish Tom Smith Box, evocative of the age it originated from, has given us the idea to search for such items which may be hidden away in attics and cupboards all over the country.
If you have or know of any such items, we kindly ask you to contact us with any pictures or information that we can collect, with the hope that if there is enough interest and memorabilia, we can produce an online archive and museum of Tom Smith history that we all can enjoy.
This box will be looked after and displayed for future generations to see, first-hand, how a traditional Christmas was celebrated over 150 years ago.